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Writing and Publishing

Login Fatigue

Do you suffer from “login fatigue?” I know I do. Login fatigue is that overwhelmed feeling produced by having too many computer login names, passwords, and codes to keep track of. (A Google search for “login fatigue” resulted in 75,400,000 entries, more than a hundred times higher then when I last checked. I am sure that number will keep growing.)

It’s not that I’m lazy or trying to make a statement about logging in. The sad reality is that I had way too many logins to keep track of.  As a result, I’ve had to resort to maintaining a list of my various cyberspace logins.

For the most part, I needed every one of them to conduct business. There are a variety of financial websites, secure access for numerous services, a plethora of logins for my diverse Internet presence (email, Websites, blogs, search engines, and so forth), and even a few—a precious few—for personal enjoyment.

Because of this frustration, I used to regularly close websites that require I login just to peek at their treasure trove of information. I’m not talking about those pay-for, subscription sites—which I steadfastly avoid. I’m referring to those free sites that demand that I setup an account and login with each visit. Nope, it’s not going to happen.

Its been suggested that we need some sort of universal login, one login that will work for multiple sites. That sounded great to me. I needed it.

So when I’ve heard about Last Pass and 1Password, I got excited. I looked into them. Both securely manage passwords and generate unique passwords for each website you use. Try them. You’ll like it.

By Peter Lyle DeHaan

Author Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, publishes books about business, customer service, the call center industry, and business and writing.

One reply on “Login Fatigue”

I worry about these kinds of services being hacked. I keep the list on my desk safely in my home. But then, I don’t have people over who would steal my log ins and I don’t keep them with a big sign on them that tells a thief “steal this book, has log ins in it”. Its in an unassuming location that is not obvious but it has all the information. Yes, I hate typing in the codes but I know they are safer.

What do you think? Please leave a comment!